Effects of Altered Prenatal Hormonal Environment on Expression of Autoimmune Disease in NZB/NZW Mice

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Effects of Altered Prenatal Hormonal Environment on Expression of Autoimmune Disease in NZB/NZW Mice

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/9897

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Title: Effects of Altered Prenatal Hormonal Environment on Expression of Autoimmune Disease in NZB/NZW Mice
Author: Walker, Sara E.; Keisler, Lydia White; Caldwell, Charles W., M.D.; Kier, Ann B.; vom Saal, Frederick S.
Keywords: endocrine disruptors
chemical hazards
environmental chemicals
Date: 1996-08
Publisher: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
Citation: Walker SE, Keisler LW, Caldwell CW, Kier AB, Vom Saal FS. Effects of altered prenatal hormonal environment on expression of autoimmune disease in NZB/NZW mice. Environmental Health Perspectives, 1996;104 (Suppl 4):815-821.
Abstract: F1 hybrid New Zealand Black (NZB) x New Zealand White (NZW) (NZB/NZW) mice spontaneously develop an autoimmune disease analogous to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) . Testosterone exerts a powerful suppressive effect on this disorder in adult NZB/NZW mice. A series of experiments was designed to determine if disease would also be suppressed by exposing fetal NZB/NZW mice to increased testosterone. NZB/NZW mice that were derived from testosterone-treated dams and control NZB/NZW offspring were followed in a longevity study and had serial assays to assess development of SLE. Control male NZB/NZW fetuses had unexpectedly high serum estradiol, which decreased significantly with maternal testosterone treatment. The testosterone-exposed male NZB/NZW fetuses developed into adults that lived longer than male NZB/NZW controls. In male NZB/NZW fetuses whose mothers were administered testosterone, the naturally high level of circulating estradiol observed in untreated male fetuses was decreased significantly. This decrease was associated with an increase in longevity. This unique observation has important implications for fetal exposure to endocrine disruptors in the environment.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/9897
ISSN: 0091-6765

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