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dc.contributor.authorvom Saal, Frederick S.eng
dc.contributor.authorHughes, Claude L., 1951-eng
dc.date.issued2005eng
dc.descriptionReproduced with permission from Environmental Health Perspectives. doi:10.1289/ehp.7713eng
dc.description.abstractBisphenol A (BPA) is the monomer used to manufacture polycarbonate plastic, the resin lining of cans, and other products, with global capacity in excess of 6.4 billion lb/year. Because the ester bonds in these BPA-based polymers are subject to hydrolysis, leaching of BPA has led to widespread human exposure. As of December 2004, there were 115 published in vivo studies concerning low-dose effects of BPA, and 94 of these report significant effects. In 31 publications with vertebrate and invertebrate animals, significant effects occurred below the predicted "safe" or reference dose of 50 µg/kg/day BPA. Nonetheless, chemical manufacturers continue to discount these published findings because no industry-funded studies have reported significant effects of low doses of BPA, although > 90% of government-funded studies have reported significant effects. Some industry-funded studies have ignored the results of positive controls, and many studies reporting no significant effects used a strain of rat that is inappropriate for the study of estrogenic responses. We propose that a new risk assessment for BPA is needed based on a) the extensive new literature reporting adverse effects in animals at doses below the current reference dose; b) the high rate of leaching of BPA from food and beverage containers, leading to widespread human exposure; c) reports that the median BPA level in human blood and tissues, including in human fetal blood, is higher than the level that causes adverse effects in mice; and d) recent epidemiologic evidence that BPA is related to disease in women.eng
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding during the preparation of the manuscript was provided by National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences grant ES11283 to F.S.eng
dc.identifier.citationvom Saal FS, Hughes C 2005 An extensive new literature concerning low-dose effects of bisphenol A shows the need for a new risk assessment. Environmental Health Perspectives 113(8):926-933.eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/9942eng
dc.publisherNational Institute of Environmental Health Scienceseng
dc.relation.ispartofBiological Sciences publications (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. College of Arts and Sciences. Division of Biological Scienceseng
dc.source.harvestedEnvironmental Health Perspectives Web site: http://ehp03.niehs.nih.gov/article/fetchArticle.action?articleURI=info:doi/1 0.1289/ehp.7713eng
dc.subject.lcshBisphenol A -- Dose-response relationshipeng
dc.subject.lcshBisphenol A -- Risk assessmenteng
dc.titleAn Extensive New Literature Concerning Low-Dose Effects of Bisphenol A Shows the Need for a New Risk Assessmenteng
dc.typeArticleeng


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