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dc.contributor.authorFrisby, James C. (James Curtis), 1930-eng
dc.contributor.authorPfost, Donald L.eng
dc.coverage.spatialMissourieng
dc.date.issued1993eng
dc.description.abstractSoil compaction is becoming a more serious problem for farmers. Field machines tend to be heaver, and there is motivation for farmers to work the soil when it is too moist. Because compacted soil has smaller pores and fewer natural channels, water infiltration is drastically reduced. This causes greater surface wetness, more runoff (which increases erosion) and longer drying time. Wet fields delay planting and harvesting and decrease crop yields. Plant roots don't grow well in dense soil. Inadequate moisture and nutrients reach the plant and yield is reduced. This guide explains the causes and effects of soil compaction.eng
dc.identifier.otherG-1630-1993eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/9972
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri Extensioneng
dc.relation.ispartofExtension publications (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionMU Extension publicationseng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Extensioneng
dc.relation.ispartofseriesG - Agricultural Guides (University of Missouri--Columbia. Extension) ; 1630eng
dc.rightsArchive version. For the most recent information see extension.missouri.edu.eng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.eng
dc.source.harvestedUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. University Extension. Extension website.eng
dc.subject.lcshSoil compactioneng
dc.subject.lcshSoil moistureeng
dc.subject.lcshFarmseng
dc.titleSoil Compaction: The Silent Thief (1993)eng
dc.typeDocumenteng


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