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dc.contributor.advisorJohnson, Gary S.eng
dc.contributor.authorZeng, Rongeng
dc.date.issued2013eng
dc.date.submitted2013 Springeng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on September 4, 2013).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Dr. Gary S. Johnsoneng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionPh. D. University of Missouri--Columbia, 2013.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Veterinary pathobiology area program.eng
dc.description"May 2013"eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT AUTHOR'S REQUEST.] The inherited diseases of the domestic dog mimic a wide spectrum of common human disorders. By identifying the genes that harbor the mutations underlying dog diseases we not only provide powerful diagnostic DNA tests for dog breeders their veterinarians and but also provide spontaneously occurring canine models for human diseases. Since the first high quality dog genome reference sequence was published and made publically accessible, various molecular strategies have been applied in the canine genetic studies including candidate gene analysis, linkage analysis, and genome-wide allele association studies. Most recently our lab has focused on the discovery of causal sequence variants in the next generation whole-genome sequences of individual affected dogs. This has enabled us to identify disease-causing genes in dogs with relevance for human health. We describe here the identification of causative mutations for three different canine diseases: neonatal cerebellar ataxia, canine degenerative myelopathy and canine multiple system degeneration. In addition, we discuss the potential importance of these canine diseases if used as human disease models.eng
dc.format.extentv, 98 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc872588718eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/37874
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/37874eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campus of the University of Missouri--Columbia.eng
dc.subjectwhole genome sequencingeng
dc.subjectgenome association studyeng
dc.subjectcandidate gene analysiseng
dc.subjectinherited diseaseseng
dc.subjectcanine diseaseseng
dc.titleMolecular genetic studies in canine inherited diseases including neonatal cerebellar ataxia, degenerative myelopathy and multiple system degenerationeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineVeterinary pathobiology area program (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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