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dc.contributor.authorThomas, Peter E.eng
dc.contributor.authorKaniewski, Wojciech K.eng
dc.date.issued2004eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.description.abstractThe need for genetic improvements of American potato was recognized as a primary target for plant genetic engineering. As immediate needs, virus and insect resistance were recognized as important and attainable goals. Russet Burbank was selected as the recipient variety, because it is highly vulnerable to virus and insect production losses, and it is the predominant American variety. The development of resistance to the Colorado potato beetle and to potato leafroll virus were selected as priority goals, because these are the most economically important pests of potato in the United States and around the world. This article describes potato research and the struggles to develop commercial products, as well as the safety, initial acceptance, and final commercial failure of developed products. Opportunities for developing countries and subsistence farmers are emphasized.eng
dc.identifier.citationAgBioForum, 7(1&2) 2004: 41-46.eng
dc.identifier.issn1522-936Xeng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/172eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherAgBioForumeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionAgBioForum, vol. 7, no. 1 & 2 (2004)eng
dc.subjecttransgenic resistanceeng
dc.subjectColorado potato beetleeng
dc.subjectpotato leafroll viruseng
dc.subjectRusset Burbankeng
dc.subjectpotato virus Yeng
dc.subject.lcshPotatoes -- Genetic engineeringeng
dc.subject.lcshGenetically modified foodseng
dc.titleThe Potato Storyeng
dc.typeArticleeng


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