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dc.contributor.advisorClarke, Bede, 1956-eng
dc.contributor.authorVenzant, Domonique Anareeng
dc.coverage.temporal2000-2099eng
dc.date.issued2010eng
dc.date.submitted2010 Falleng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on April 6, 2011).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Bede Clarke.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionM.F.A. University of Missouri--Columbia 2010.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Art.eng
dc.description.abstractThe focus of this visual investigation is the relationship between the individual and the larger group. I often struggle to understand myself, my curiosities and motivations and how they relate to the greater society. I am a multicultural-multiethnic man, living within the greater context of American society. Being a visually distinct member of the American social landscape is infused with difficulties regarding race, bias, and negativity that are often based on perceived differences. My struggle to understand my relationship to the larger community has resulted in an attempt to depict the core of inter-human relationships by using ceramic sculpture as form of analogue for these social relationships. Creating objects from clay, wood, and steel has provided a sense of security that helps me recognize my concerns regarding difference by crystallizing them in the physical realness of objects which provides a distinct perspective that engages social bias. Identity, whether it is personal, social, or cultural is constructed from a mélange of fragments that edifies the value of accumulated experience. The work produced in response to this understanding is accretive and amalgam. More often than not these visual experiments in self understanding are executed in clay. Repeated ceramic forms provide analogues for human individuals or groups. The visual undercurrent of this work is barrowed from minimalist portraiture, still life representation, as well as fragments of experience and memory.eng
dc.format.extentvi, 55 pageseng
dc.identifier.merlinb82193435eng
dc.identifier.oclc714121486eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/10554
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/10554eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartof2010 Freely available theses (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2010 Theseseng
dc.source.originalSubmitted by University of Missouri--Columbia Graduate School.eng
dc.subject.lcshEthnicity in arteng
dc.subject.lcshCeramic sculptureeng
dc.subject.lcshSculpture, Americaneng
dc.titleNecessary imbalance: ceramic sculpture as human social analogueeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineArt (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.F.A.eng


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