Talking beyond the text: identifying and fostering critical talk in a middle school classroom

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Talking beyond the text: identifying and fostering critical talk in a middle school classroom

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/4086

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dc.contributor.advisor Gilles, Carol en
dc.contributor.author Wilson, Jennifer L. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2010-01-06T21:01:26Z
dc.date.available 2010-01-06T21:01:26Z
dc.date.issued 2004 en_US
dc.date.submitted 2004 Fall en
dc.identifier.other WilsonJ-122204-D243 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10355/4086
dc.description The entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file. en_US
dc.description Title from title screen of research.pdf file viewed on (June 29, 2006) en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references. en_US
dc.description Vita. en_US
dc.description Thesis (Ph. D.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2004. en_US
dc.description Dissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Curriculum and instruction. en_US
dc.description.abstract This qualitative inquiry examined eighty-one transcribed student and teacher discussions and interviews and researcher field notes to determine the type of talk that occurred as the teacher invited small groups of students to take part in dialogue prompted by literature. Four themes emerged from the data: teacher's knowledge, processing time, various forms of scaffolding, and oral rubrics. During in-depth analysis of ten selected transcripts, additional themes of the nature of critical talk emerged. First, students explored critical concepts such as recognizing a need for action, becoming aware of injustices, and challenging the status quo. Also, student talk scaled the ladder of abstraction, offering concrete examples that made their discussions more applicable to their lives, while at the same time traveling up the ladder, abstracting the is sues to begin to explore larger more systemic causes of particular injustices. Second, some students believed that they were changed by the interactions while others felt as if they had gained new understandings of particular concepts, issues, or beliefs. A continuum of the type of student talk shows how students' talk moves among social talk, fundamental text talk, socio-interpretive text talk,critical talk, and critical conversations. As students traverse along the continuum, various needs can be met. As teachers recognize where students' talk is on the continuum, they can lead students to deeper literature study discussions. In order to help students take a more critical approach when discussing texts, teachers must scaffold the talk and provide the time for students to grapple with critical concepts. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher University of Missouri--Columbia en_US
dc.relation.ispartof 2004 Freely available dissertations (MU) en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Reading comprehension en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Reading (Elementary) en_US
dc.title Talking beyond the text: identifying and fostering critical talk in a middle school classroom en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
thesis.degree.discipline Learning, teaching and curriculum en_US
thesis.degree.grantor University of Missouri--Columbia en_US
thesis.degree.name Ph. D. en_US
thesis.degree.level Doctoral en_US
dc.identifier.merlin .b55844947 en_US
dc.relation.ispartofcommunity University of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Dissertations. 2004 Dissertations


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