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dc.contributor.advisorFaaborg, John, 1949-eng
dc.contributor.authorMorris, Dana L., 1971-eng
dc.date.issued2005eng
dc.date.submitted2005 Summereng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file viewed on (July 18, 2006)eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2005.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Biological sciences.eng
dc.description.abstractForest fragmentation creates edge habitat that attracts nest predators that lower reproductive success and force birds to renest. To determine if predation-induced renesting causes a decline in condition of females and reduces productivity and offspring quality, I measured maternal condition and reproductive output of Indigo Buntings breeding in a fragmented and a contiguously forested landscape in Missouri. Renesting females had lower body condition than those that nested once successfully. As maternal condition declined with nesting attempt, stress hormone levels increased, suggesting poor-conditioned females lack the energetic reserves to meet increased demands. Additionally, females in poor condition produced small clutches and poor-conditioned nestlings. A higher proportion of nests containing all-female offspring indicates a bias in production of the smaller, less profitable sex in the fragmented landscape. These results suggest that increased reproductive effort associated with renesting imposes costs to breeding females and decreases their ability to invest in high quality offspring.eng
dc.identifier.merlinb5589477xeng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/4118
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.source.originalSubmitted by University of Missouri--Columbia Graduate School.eng
dc.subject.lcshFragmented landscapeseng
dc.subject.lcshIndigo bunting -- Reproductioneng
dc.titleEffects of forest fragmentation on reproductive effort and productivity of Indigo buntings (Passerina cyanea)eng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineBiological sciences (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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