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dc.contributor.advisorFagan, Mary K.eng
dc.contributor.authorMillett, Amanda L.eng
dc.contributor.otherUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2013 Theseseng
dc.date.issued2013eng
dc.date.submitted2013 Springeng
dc.descriptionA Thesis presented to the Faculty of the Graduate School at the University of Missouri In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree Master of Health Science.eng
dc.descriptionThesis supervisor: Dr. Mary K. Fagan.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 42-44).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire text is included in the research.pdf file; the abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical general description appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT AUTHOR'S REQUEST.] Studies of maternal responsiveness to infant vocalizations shed light on mothers' role in language development. This study examined contingent verbal responses produced by 35 mothers to infants 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, and 14 months of age, using a cross-sectional design. Contingent responses (i.e., responsive utterances) were defined as conceptually dependent and meaningful verbal responses that occurred within 3 seconds following the onset of an infant vocal behavior. Non-responsive utterances were defined as maternal utterances that occurred within 3 seconds following the onset of an infant vocal behavior but did not meet criteria for a conceptually dependent and meaningful response. Maternal responses were classified into eight response-type categories: affirmation, comment, description, gasp, imitation, laugh, prompt, and question. The purpose of the study was to determine frequency of mothers' contingent verbal responses and acoustic and linguistic characteristics of mothers' responsive and non-responsive utterances. Results of acoustic analyses show responsive and non-responsive utterances were similar in terms of mean frequency, but responses were less linguistically complex compared to non-responsive utterances. Mothers were verbally responsive to 25 percent of infant vocal behaviors, responding primarily to infant speech-like vocalizations with single utterances in the form of questions and affirmations. Implications for language development, study limitations, and future research are discussed.eng
dc.format.extent1 online resource (vi, 44 pages) : illustrations.eng
dc.identifier.oclc891380384eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/43147
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/43147eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartof2013 MU restricted theses (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the University of Missouri - Columbia.eng
dc.source.originalSubmitted by the University of Missouri--Columbia Graduate Schooleng
dc.subject.lcshChildren -- Language.eng
dc.subject.lcshInfants -- Development.eng
dc.subject.lcshMother and infant.eng
dc.titleMaternal verbal responsiveness to infant vocalizationseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunication science and disorders (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.H.S.eng


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