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dc.contributor.advisorSemlitsch, Raymond D.eng
dc.contributor.advisorEggert, Lori S. (Lori Suzanne)eng
dc.contributor.authorPeterman, William Earl, 1982-eng
dc.coverage.spatialMissourieng
dc.date.issued2013eng
dc.date.submitted2013 Summereng
dc.description.abstractInferring process from pattern can be a challenging undertaking when dealing with ecological complexity. The distribution and abundance of organisms on the landscape is often interpreted through the lens of competition, movement, or physiology, as well as interactions with the abiotic environment. Further, movement, distribution, and abundance often coincide with favorable abiotic environments such as temperature, moisture, or nutrients. At its core, landscape genetics seeks to identify the spatial processes shaping the observed patterns of genetic diversity across the landscape, but most landscape genetic studies are predominantly exploratory and lack well-established hypotheses. To increase understanding of process-driven patterns in landscape genetics, I studied the western slimy salamander (Plethodon albagula) in east-central Missouri with three specific questions: (1) Where are salamanders on the landscape, and what environmental factors influence local abundance? (2) Is there a physiological constraint underlying the observed patterns of distribution and abundance? (3) How is spatial genetic structure shaped by abundance and physiology across the landscape? I utilized a combination of abundance modeling, spatial quantification of water loss using plaster of Paris models, and landscape genetics analyses to assess the factors contributing to genetic differentiation across a 1300 ha landscape. Plethodontid salamanders are highly sensitive to water loss, in part due to their lack of lungs and cutaneous respiration. I found that abundance of salamanders was best predicted by canopy cover, topographic position (ridge, slope, ravine), and the interaction between wetness and solar exposure. The spatial relationships of these factors are such that abundance is predicted to be highest in forested ravines with lower solar exposure. Plaster models deployed across the landscape served as surrogates for live salamanders to quantify rates of water loss. I found that rates of water loss across the landscape were inverselyeng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.format.extent1 online resource (vii, 95 pages) : illustrations (some color), mapseng
dc.identifier.oclc898992597eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/44042
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/44042eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartof2013 Freely available dissertations (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.
dc.source.originalSubmitted by the University of Missouri--Columbia Graduate School.eng
dc.subject.lcshWoodland salamanderseng
dc.titleFactors affecting abundance, physiology, and fine-scale genetic differentiation of the western slimy salamander (Plethodon albagula)eng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineBiological sciences (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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