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dc.contributor.advisorHesse, Colineng
dc.contributor.advisorColaner, Colleeneng
dc.contributor.authorWenzel, Kristina A.eng
dc.date.issued2014eng
dc.date.submitted2014 Summereng
dc.descriptionAbstract from public.pdf.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT AUTHOR'S REQUEST.] Family caregivers have become increasingly essential to the care of impaired older people (Wolff & Kasper, 2006). While much research as investigated family caregiving relationships, little research has explored how these caregiving relationships are renegotiated through communication (Hummert & Morgan, 2001) and even less is known about the more specific negotiation of privacy issues. This study utilized Communication Privacy Management theory to (a) explore how older parents and adult children recalibrate privacy boundaries to meet the care needs of aging parents, and (b) identify patterns of privacy management that occur when older parents and adult children transition into parental caregiving relationship. Thus, this project employed a turning point analysis to explore the changes in privacy in parental caregiving relationships from the perspective of 27 adult children who have cared for an older parent. Findings expand current research on parental caregiving by detailing how caregiving relationships manage privacy. Parental caregivers coped with ambiguity, uncertainty, and ambivalence related to the management of older parents� private information during the caregiving experience. Four boundary recalibration patterns emerged to negotiate boundary coordination: (a) crescendo, (b) oscillation, c) segmenting, and (d) relinquishment. Results also indicated turning points events, barriers and boundary linkages to parents� private information, and common patterns of boundary permeability associated with the development of parental caregiving relationships. The author argues several implications and directions for future research from these findings, including the need to investigate boundary recalibration processes into examinations of relational change and to explore the relationship between caregiver self-efficacy and perceived similarity of boundary coordination and permeability.eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/46447
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations.eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campuses of the University of Missouri.eng
dc.sourceSubmitted by the University of Missouri--Columbia Graduate School.eng
dc.subject.FASTCaregivers -- Family relationshipseng
dc.subject.FASTPrivacyeng
dc.title"Tell me so that I can help you" : a turning point analysis of privacy in the development of parental caregiving relationshipseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunication (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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