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dc.contributor.advisorMacGregor, Cynthia J. (Cynthia Jane), 1962-eng
dc.contributor.authorRobison, Jane E., 1950-eng
dc.date.issued2007eng
dc.date.submitted2007 Springeng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on October 9, 2007)eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionThesis (Ed. D.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2007.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Educational leadership and policy analysis.eng
dc.description.abstractEntrepreneurialism, globalism, and neoliberalism have influenced higher education to adopt a business model. Some critics view the university as having strayed from its public service role; others see this adaptation as relevant to a modern global society. Response to these influences is seen in current efforts to internationalize campuses and increase revenues by recruiting international students. As competition for international students increases, many institutions have begun using agents, yet this practice is often considered unethical. Because administrators need to make informed decisions in the best interests of students, this study explored the ethical dimensions of this growing phenomenon. This multi-case qualitative study examined the experiences of international students recruited through agents and of institutional personnel who recruit through agents. Data were collected from interviews with recruiting officers and international students, a survey of recruiting officers, and documents from the institutions, agents, and professional organizations. As data were analyzed through a framework defining ethical as "other-regarding," four distinct themes emerged - power and control, information flow and accuracy, financial and recruiting benefits, and accountability and trust. A new model evolved to equitably serve each stakeholder. Implications for practice specify guidelines to protect the student's best interests and the institution's reputation during all stages of the recruitment process. Future research would explore the ethicality issue from the agent's perspective or examine the impact of culture on the perception of ethicality in the process of recruitment.eng
dc.identifier.merlinb60062319eng
dc.identifier.oclc173843801eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/4862
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/4862eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.subject.lcshStudents, Foreign -- Recruitingeng
dc.subject.lcshCollege students -- Recruitingeng
dc.subject.lcshCommercial agentseng
dc.titleEthical considerations in the use of commercial agents in international student recruitmenteng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational leadership and policy analysis (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.nameEd. D.eng


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