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dc.contributor.advisorVos, Tim P.eng
dc.contributor.authorMeyer, Melissa D., 1986-eng
dc.coverage.spatialMiddle Easteng
dc.date.issued2010eng
dc.date.submitted2010 Summereng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on August 12, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dr. Tim Vos.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionM.A. University of Missouri--Columbia 2010.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Journalism.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT AUTHOR'S REQUEST.] A textual analysis studied U.S. and U.K. newspaper articles written about journalists kidnapped while reporting in the Middle East to uncover news frames, explore differences in journalism standards, and to see if there was any alignment with the respective countries' military or political agendas. There were four dominant news frames that emerged from this study: responsibility, conflict, human interest, and morality. Also, various sub-frames emerged that were connected to each primary frame. The primary frames were shared across newspapers, though the morality frame was more likely to be used by U.K. newspapers. The U.K. newspapers showed differences in reporting standards through frequent utilization of anonymous sources and unattributed facts, by using first-person accounts, and through emotive language. These differences in factuality, neutrality, and detachment were seen across news frames and were not connected to a specific frame used by U.K. newspapers. The newspapers showed various levels of agreement with the political and military agendas of the U.S. and U.K. The main area of dissonance was the lack of a terrorism frame in the newspaper articles. The articles view of the terrorist networks involved in the kidnappings was also inconsistent with the governments' stance that the networks are extremely violent and an imminent threat.eng
dc.format.extentv, 79 pageseng
dc.identifier.merlinb81080177eng
dc.identifier.oclc694518414eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/9531
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/9531eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartof2010 UM restricted theses (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2010 Theseseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campuses of the University of Missouri.eng
dc.subject.lcshJournalistseng
dc.subject.lcshKidnapping victimseng
dc.subject.lcshKidnappingeng
dc.subject.lcshPolitical kidnappingeng
dc.subject.lcshTerrorismeng
dc.subject.lcshHostageseng
dc.titleFraming journalists' kidnappings: a textual analysis of news frames from U.S. and U.K. newspapers covering journalists' kidnappings in the Middle Easteng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineJournalism (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.A.eng


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