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dc.contributor.advisorBell, Jackie (Jacquelyn S.)eng
dc.contributor.authorDay, Elisaeng
dc.coverage.spatialBelgium -- Brusselseng
dc.coverage.spatialMissouri -- Columbiaeng
dc.date.issued2012eng
dc.date.submitted2012 Falleng
dc.description"Fall, 2012."eng
dc.descriptionProfessional project report submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Masters of Arts in Journalism from the University of Missouri--Columbia, School of Journalism.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on March 21, 2013).eng
dc.description.abstractThis project seeks to answer the question of whether background and experience influence the ways that photojournalists cover Muslims and whether September 11, 2001, had any influence on their perceptions or approach. Scholarly research has found that personal bias can influence the type of news published and it posits that Western media typically approaches this minority group in a very Orientalist way, categorizing them in negative terms. Using textual analysis, I compared the interviews of three photojournalists who cover international events in Brussels, Belgium, to discover whether their publication process allowed for this bias; whether it influenced the type of images they created/submitted for publication and whether 9/11 had any impact. Although the three saw negative bias in media coverage, it did not influence their image production or publication. Because they acted as the primary editor for their wire services, the photojournalists had a large amount of control over image publication. While they had differing explanations for the media's negative portrayal, it did not influence a dedication to portraying events as honestly and objectively as possible. The events of 9/11, nor the 2011 upheavals in the Middle East, did not sway them from their commitment to objective truth. This objectivity was illustrated as well in my internship, where the types of assignments and images selected for publication had nothing to do with any aspect of religion, but instead focused on events and political situations.eng
dc.identifier.merlin.b96372229eng
dc.identifier.oclc841400505eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/33511
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. School of Journalism. Journalism masters projectseng
dc.subjectphotojournalistseng
dc.subjectpersonal biaseng
dc.subjectimage publicationeng
dc.subjectimage productioneng
dc.subject.lcshJournalism -- Study and teaching (Internship)eng
dc.subject.lcshMuslims -- Press coverageeng
dc.subject.lcshPhotojournalistseng
dc.subject.lcshRacism in the presseng
dc.subject.lcshSeptember 11 Terrorist Attacks, 2001eng
dc.subject.lcshJournalism -- Study and teachingeng
dc.titleIslam and the West : how do background and experience influence how photojournalists cover Muslims? Professional project in three partseng
dc.typeBookeng


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