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dc.contributor.advisorSocarides, Alexandraeng
dc.contributor.advisorCairns, Scotteng
dc.contributor.authorKartalopoulos, Stephanieeng
dc.date.issued2013eng
dc.date.submitted2013 Springeng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on September 3, 2013).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisors: Dr. Alexandra Socarides and Dr. Scott Cairnseng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionPh. D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2013.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- English.eng
dc.description"May 2013"eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT AUTHOR'S REQUEST.] The creative portion of this dissertation consists of my first poetry manuscript called Amulet. The poems are prefaced by a critical essay, “The Confessional Mode,” which contends with Diane Warren Middlebrook's label of Confessional American poetry as a literary movement timed between the mid-1950s and the early-1960s. This essay acknowledges how Middlebrook theorizes of the Confessional poems of Robert Lowell, Anne Sexton, and their peers as being shaped dramatically by a series of external cues—namely the rise in post-war nationalism, new access to media and technology, and emerging trends in psychoanalysis. The essay then argues that we approach Confessionalism, instead, as a mode of poetry that emerges from the continued, trans-historical trend of a voice that articulates the poetic speaker's confession. The notion of the poetic speaker as necessarily a persona of the poet is problematized. For the Confessional poem, this is not dependably so. Greater distinction must be made between the poet and speaker; their articulations typically overlap in the act of Confession. To support my argument, I explore the overlap of speaker' voice and poet's voice through a lineage of Confessional poetry in the American literary tradition that extends as far back as Anne Bradstreet's personal poetry and reaches into more contemporary poems by Lucie Brock-Broido and the poets who Stephen Burt classifies as “elliptical.” This essay engages criticism by Louise Glück, Gregory Orr, Adrienne Rich, and Samuel Maio and explores the extent to which the voice that articulates the poem overlaps with the poet's own voice.eng
dc.format.extentvi, 86 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc872588729eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/37845
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/37845eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations.eng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campus of the University of Missouri--Columbia.eng
dc.subjectconfessional poetryeng
dc.subjectAmerican poetryeng
dc.subjectexternal cueseng
dc.subjectpoetic speakereng
dc.titleAmuleteng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglish (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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