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dc.contributor.advisorPiasecki, Thomas Michaeleng
dc.contributor.authorRichardson, Alison E.eng
dc.date.issued2007eng
dc.date.submitted2007 Springeng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on November 5, 2007)eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2007.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Psychology.eng
dc.description.abstractDrinkers differ meaningfully in their susceptibility to hangover, and prior studies suggest individual differences in hangover proneness may be related to risk for alcohol use disorders (AUD). This project examined whether smoking behavior, a frequent concomitant of drinking, accounts for some of the variation in self-reported hangover. Data from a longitudinal familial high-risk study (N=489; 51% with a family history of AUD) were used to assess the association of smoking with hangover. Cross-sectional and multilevel regression results revealed a main effect for smoking such that smokers reported higher mean hangover, and smoking interacted with alcohol consumption such that the relation between drinking and hangover was weaker among smokers than among nonsmokers. Exploration of hangover at early and late time-points among naturally occurring groups who changed smoking status reinforced these results. Logistic regression analyses showed that hangover was associated with risk for AUD, and that this effect remained even after controlling for smoking status, suggesting the relation between early hangover and later AUD is not simply an artifact of failing to account for smoking behavior. These findings raise the intriguing possibility that smoking contributes to individual variation in hangover, and that smoking might be a permissive factor in the escalation of drinking.eng
dc.identifier.merlinb61259019eng
dc.identifier.oclc180703163eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/4891
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/4891eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2007 Theseseng
dc.subject.lcshAlcohol -- Physiological effecteng
dc.subject.lcshDrinking of alcoholic beverageseng
dc.subject.lcshSmokingeng
dc.titleExploring the relation between cigarette smoking and alcohol hangover frequencyeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychology (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.A.eng


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