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dc.contributor.advisorBackus, Roberteng
dc.contributor.advisorBailey, Wayne Charleseng
dc.contributor.authorMeihls, Lisa N.eng
dc.coverage.spatialMissourieng
dc.date.issued2007eng
dc.date.submitted2007 Springeng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on October 31, 2007)eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionThesis (M.S.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2007.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Entomology.eng
dc.description.abstractThe recently introduced soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura, is found in all soybean growing areas within Missouri. Despite soybean aphid's widespread distribution, it has reached economic threshold in few soybean fields in Missouri. We hypothesized that a predator complex suppresses soybean aphid populations in Missouri prior to reaching economic threshold and that this complex can easily be disturbed by insecticide applications. To determine which predator is most responsible for suppressing aphid numbers, we caged soybean plants with different size meshes. The dominant predatory insects observed were O. insidiosus (39.5%) and coccinellids (37.4%). Predators had a significant impact on soybean aphid establishment and population growth; populations exposed to predators never reached economic threshold while populations in cages which excluded predators quickly reached threshold. Soybean aphid populations in cages with small mesh infested on July 21 had significantly higher rate of increase than all other July 21 infested cages. Soybean aphid populations in August 5 infested cages with small and medium size mesh had higher rates of increase than large and no mesh cages. To determine how resilient the predator complex was, soybean plots were subjected to four insecticidal spray schedules. Predator efficacy was not significantly impacted by insecticide applications; soybean aphid populations in all spray schedules remained well below economic threshold.eng
dc.identifier.merlinb61226427eng
dc.identifier.oclc180158316eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/4966
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/4966eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollection2007 Freely available theses (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2007 Theseseng
dc.subjectAphis glycines Matsumura ; Orius insidiosus.eng
dc.subjectAphis glycines Matsumura ; Orius insidiosuseng
dc.subject.lcshAphidseng
dc.subject.lcshSoybean -- Diseases and pestseng
dc.subject.lcshScale insectseng
dc.subject.lcshAnthocoridaeeng
dc.titlePredator-prey interactions involving the soybean aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae) in Missourieng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineEntomology (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.S.eng


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