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dc.contributor.advisorPiper, Karen Lynnea, 1965-eng
dc.contributor.authorFord, Na'Imah Hanan, 1976-eng
dc.date.issued2007eng
dc.date.submitted2007 Falleng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on March 12, 2009)eng
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2007.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT REQUEST OF AUTHOR.] The term Yere-Wolo in Mande culture describes the process of "giving birth to oneself," a poetic way to envision the coming-of-age process. I use this concept to explore identity construction and adolescent development in various Bildungsroman novels throughout the African Diaspora. Though the female Bildungsroman form has afforded many women novelists the space to create subjectivity through the very personal, often autobiographical, experiences of young protagonists who struggle with patriarchy and oppression, the Yere-Wolo model provides a divergent reading of coming-of-age texts written by and about women of color. Often critics within the Bildungsroman genre point to a more individualistic, nationalistic process of maturation rather than a communal, diasporic one; therefore I created a theory of Yere-Wolo in order to offer a reading of these novels that is grounded in black feminist/womanist theories, is culturally specific and connects these writers using five recurring elements that I identify in my investigation of these texts. In the first chapter I use Tsitsi Dangarembga's Nervous Conditions and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's Purple Hibiscus to discuss the African woman's quest for selfhood in the midst of pos/neo colonialism. The second chapter on Andrea Levy's Never Far From Nowhere conveys the difficulties of constructing identity in reference to race, class, and gender within a European space. In the third chapter, I look at Michelle Cliff's Abeng to investigate language and identity in the Caribbean. Finally, I include Paule Marshall's Brown Girl Brownstones to examine coming-of-age in America and transnational identity.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical referenceseng
dc.identifier.merlinb66636620eng
dc.identifier.oclc314411028eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/5959eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/5959
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campus of the University of Missouri--Columbia.eng
dc.subject.lcshDangarembga, Tsitsi -- Nervous conditionseng
dc.subject.lcshAdichie, Chimamanda Ngozi, 1977- -- Purple hibiscuseng
dc.subject.lcshLevy, Andrea, 1956- -- Never far from nowhereeng
dc.subject.lcshCliff, Michelle -- Abengeng
dc.subject.lcshMarshall, Paule, 1929- -- Brown girl brownstoneseng
dc.subject.lcshBildungsromanseng
dc.subject.lcshAfrican diasporaeng
dc.subject.lcshAfrican literatureeng
dc.subject.lcshMandingo (African people)eng
dc.titleA theory of Yere-Wolo : coming-of-age narratives in African diaspora literatureeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglish (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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