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dc.contributor.advisorGompper, Matthew Edzarteng
dc.contributor.authorMonello, Ryan Josepheng
dc.coverage.spatialMissourieng
dc.date.issued2009eng
dc.date.submitted2009 Springeng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on ).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Dr. Matthew E. Gompper.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionPh. D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2009.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Fisheries and wildlife.eng
dc.description.abstractI investigated how experimental increases in social aggregation and resource availability affected ectoparasite prevalence and intensity (number of parasites on infested hosts only) and endoparasite species richness of raccoons. Twelve independent raccoon populations were randomly subjected to differential resource provisions for two years; a clumped food distribution to aggregate hosts (n = 5 populations), a dispersed food distribution to control for the effects of food without aggregating hosts (n = 3), and a no food treatment (n = 4). The intensity of ticks was greater in aggregated populations, particularly among male raccoons. Conversely, the intensity of lice on male raccoons declined in aggregated populations due to greater overdispersion of lice and a larger number of male hosts harboring fewer parasites. The intensity of fleas did not differ among treatments and displayed no correlation with host characteristics. Among endoparasites, there was strong evidence that food additions decreased the number of indirectly transmitted parasites, particularly among the oldest age classes at sites with clumped food. Conversely, food and social aggregation had little to no impact on the species richness of directly transmitted parasites. These results suggest that the effects of increased resources and social aggregation of hosts are parasite-specific and can be dependent on parasite mobility and route of transmission, as well as sex-related differences in host behavior or physiology.eng
dc.format.extentxviii, 180 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc522384172eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/6152
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/6152eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.subject.lcshRaccoon -- Parasiteseng
dc.subject.lcshRaccoon -- Feeding and feedseng
dc.titleExperimentally assessing the influence of resource availability and social aggregation on the parasites of raccoonseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineFisheries and wildlife sciences (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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