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dc.contributor.advisorPigg, Kenneth E.eng
dc.contributor.authorLovell, Donielle M., 1979-eng
dc.coverage.spatialMississippi -- Delta (Region)eng
dc.date.issued2009eng
dc.date.submitted2009 Summereng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on Feb 26, 2010).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Kenneth E. Pigg.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionPh.D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2009 .eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Rural Sociology.eng
dc.description.abstractWhile there is much work on the Mississippi Delta, it is varied. There is a large literature base focusing on the Civil Rights Movement. There is also a large literature base focusing on the social and economic issues such as persistent poverty, access to health care, and educational attainment deficits. During the 1980's and 1990's work was conducted to better understand the changes in the Delta since the Civil Rights Movement. Since then there have been many firsts for women and African Americans in the region. For African American men, they were beginning to be elected into positions that were traditionally held by white men. Most notably, they were being elected in towns where black men had never served as mayor. Further, women were increasing their numbers in terms of elected leadership, particularly as mayors of small towns. These strides have yet to be captured in research. Therefore, this study is exploratory. Using a life history approach, interviews were conducted with nineteen Delta mayors. Participants note how structures such as race, class and gender shape power relations. Findings show that race still structures relationships in the Mississippi Delta. The work also shows how gender in a rural area is a constraint for female leaders. The work also found ways in which social class enable and constrain mayors. Social institutions such as the church, family and community are also considered as participants noted the importance of these institutions in learning about leadership.eng
dc.format.extentvii, 178 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc607532417eng
dc.identifier.otherLovellD-072409-D313eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/7029eng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollection2009 Freely available dissertations (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Dissertations. 2009 Dissertationseng
dc.subject.lcshDelta (Miss. : Region) -- Race relations -- Political aspectseng
dc.subject.lcshWomen politicianseng
dc.subject.lcshAfrican American meneng
dc.subject.lcshAfrican American politicianseng
dc.subject.lcshAfrican American mayorseng
dc.subject.lcshCommunity leadershipeng
dc.titleLeading in the Mississippi Delta: an exploratory study of race, class and gendereng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineRural sociology (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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