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dc.contributor.advisorEggert, Lori S.eng
dc.contributor.authorBudd, Kristin (Kris)eng
dc.date.issued2021eng
dc.date.submitted2021 Summereng
dc.description.abstractThe Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) is an endangered species whose distribution spans 13 countries in south, southeast, and insular Asia. The primary threats to the survival of this species include direct conflict, primarily in the forms of poaching and crop-raiding, as well indirect conflict such as habitat loss and fragmentation. Due to the elephant's elusive behavior within their dense vegetative habitat and the fact that their large size presents handling dangers to researchers and elephants, research increasingly relies on noninvasive monitoring combined with a diverse assemblage of genetic tools. This dissertation uses conservation genetics to evaluate major conflict and conservation issues for Asian elephants. The first study, in the Bago Yoma region of Myanmar, evaluates the impact of direct human-conflict in a high-density area of humans and elephants. Here elephants are heavily impacted by the developing skin trade, and condensed populations frequently raid local farms forined the overall population structure and gained demographic insights as to what defines a crop-raider. The second study, conducted in the Nakai plateau elephant population of Lao PDR, compared and contrasted the diversity and demography of a population of high conservation value before and after the construction of a hydroelectric dam. The results revealed a seasonally shifting population, unique from the previous occupants of the plateau, and a decline in genetic diversity. In the final study, genetic data from across the species' range was used to identify hotspots of genetic diversity despite marker selection bias, a problem frequently encountered in conservation genetic studies. The results highlight the evolutionary distinctiveness and conservation value of populations, particularly in southeast Asia, for conservation management of this iconic species.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.format.extentxiv, 154 pages : illustrationseng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/88043
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/88043eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.titleConservation genetics of conflict in the Asian elephant, Elephas maximuseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineBiological sciences (MU)eng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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