Damn with faint praise: a historical commentary on Plutarch's On the fortune or virtue of Alexander the Great 1

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Damn with faint praise: a historical commentary on Plutarch's On the fortune or virtue of Alexander the Great 1

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/9572

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dc.contributor.advisor Worthington, Ian en_US
dc.contributor.author Gilley, Dawn L. en_US
dc.coverage.spatial Greece
dc.coverage.spatial Macedonia
dc.coverage.temporal To 168 B.C en_US
dc.coverage.temporal 359-323 B.C en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-01-14T16:44:20Z
dc.date.available 2011-01-14T16:44:20Z
dc.date.issued 2009 en_US
dc.date.submitted 2009 Spring en_US
dc.identifier.other GilleyD-110509-D567 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10355/9572
dc.description Title from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on Sept 10, 2010). en_US
dc.description The entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file. en_US
dc.description Dissertation advisor: Dr. Ian Worthington. en_US
dc.description Vita. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references. en_US
dc.description Ph. D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2009. en_US
dc.description Dissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- History. en_US
dc.description.abstract Plutarch's On the Fortune or Virtue of Alexander the Great is as much a revelation of Plutarch's philosophical thought as it is a display of his rhetorical skill. Writing during the Second Sophistic movement, Plutarch challenged basic conceptions of philosophy by asking whether it was theory or practice that made a philosopher. He used the life and reign of Alexander the Great as his general framework for analysis. Also, by casting Alexander as a philosopher, an artificial paradox, Plutarch took advantage of events in the king's life, about which his audience would have been well aware, to play on common perceptions of the king, thereby causing some modern scholars to suggest that the work has no historical value. It was through rhetorical exploitation that Plutarch denigrated the Macedonian king, revealing him to be a megalomaniac who cared little for his own men or newly conquered subjects, but more for his own glory. Through this paradox of Alexander as a philosopher, Plutarch concluded that philosophy is both a theoretical and practical pursuit, and that it should be practically applied to one's life. This dissertation not only sheds light on Plutarch's rhetorical skill and view of Alexander, but also elevates the work's standing as a source for the life and reign of the king. en_US
dc.format.extent ix, 370 pages en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher University of Missouri--Columbia en_US
dc.relation.ispartof 2009 Freely available dissertations (MU) en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Plutarch. Alexander en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Alexander, the Great, 356-323 B.C en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Macedonia -- History -- To 168 B.C en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Greece -- History en_US
dc.title Damn with faint praise: a historical commentary on Plutarch's On the fortune or virtue of Alexander the Great 1 en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
thesis.degree.discipline History en_US
thesis.degree.grantor University of Missouri--Columbia en_US
thesis.degree.name Ph. D. en_US
thesis.degree.level Doctoral en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 694884268 en_US
dc.relation.ispartofcommunity University of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Dissertations. 2009 Dissertations


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