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dc.contributor.advisorYang, John J., 1959-eng
dc.contributor.advisorGoyne, Keith Williameng
dc.contributor.authorTang, Xi, 1982-eng
dc.coverage.spatialMissouri -- Jasper Countyeng
dc.date.issued2007eng
dc.date.submitted2007 Springeng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on November 6, 2007)eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionThesis (M.S.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2007.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Soil and atmospheric sciences.eng
dc.description.abstractIn situ application of soluble phosphates and organic matter is considered to be a cost effective remediation technique for immobilizing lead (Pb) and other heavy metals and reducing health and ecological risks associated with contaminated soils. However, a longterm assessment of risk reduction induced by metal immobilization is needed to verify efficacy and gain regulatory and public acceptance of phosphate-based and organic matter-based remedial technologies. The study sites included a smelter-contaminated urban site, a mill-waste contaminated site, and a mining-waste contaminated site within the Jasper County Superfund Site, Southwestern Missouri. Field plots at the urban site were treated with phosphoric acid at a rate of 10 g kg⁻¹ using surface application (SA), rototilling (RT), and pressure injection (PI); plots at the mill-waste site were treated with phosphoric acid at rates of 7.5 and 10 g kg⁻¹ and incorporated using rototilling; plots at the mining-waste site were treated with different types of organic amendments, including biosolids and agricultural byproducts. The parameters chosen to assess long-term risk reduction were: (1) metal bioavailability to organisms; (2) metal availability to plants (i.e., phytoavailability); (3) toxicity of treated soils to microorganisms; (4) phosphate and metal stability; and (5) solid phase P and Pb speciation assessed using microscopic, spectroscopic, and chemical fractionation techniques. Results demonstrated that most of the phosphoric acid and OM treatments significantly reduced bioavailability, phytoavailability, and leachability of metals (Pb and Cd) in the contaminated soil. Analysis of P and Pb fractionation confirmed these reductions as well. In addition, most of treatments did not significantly impact toxicity in the soil to microorganisms. Thus, the in situ remediation of metal contaminated soil using phosphoric acid and OM is considered to be a practical remediation strategy with longterm benefits.eng
dc.identifier.merlinb61263990eng
dc.identifier.oclc180773298eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/4911
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/4911eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollection2007 Freely available theses (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2007 Theseseng
dc.subject.lcshPhosphoric acideng
dc.subject.lcshHazardous waste siteseng
dc.subject.lcshIn situ remediationeng
dc.subject.lcshHazardous waste site remediationeng
dc.titleRisk and stability of phosphate-immobilized lead in contaminated urban soil and mining sites in the Jasper County Superfund Siteeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineSoil, environmental and atmospheric sciences (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.S.eng


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