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dc.contributor.advisorSheldon, Kennon M. (Kennon Marshall)eng
dc.contributor.authorAbad, Neetu Suresheng
dc.coverage.spatialUnited Stateseng
dc.date.issued2007eng
dc.date.submitted2007 Springeng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on October 22, 2007)eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2007.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Psychology.eng
dc.description.abstractBorn and raised in the U.S., children of immigrants often face difficult choices between endorsing their family's country of origin (natal culture) and mainstream U.S. society (host culture). Although second generation immigrants desire to fit into the host society, their parents often demand that they adhere to norms and traditions of the natal culture. Previous studies have shown controlling or non-autonomous parenting to be associated with negative outcomes, so this study sought to demonstrate the role of maternal and paternal autonomy-support in promoting positive and intrinsic natal acculturation among second-generation immigrants. Two studies were conducted to test this hypothesis. In Study 1, college-aged second-generation immigrants were asked to report perceived maternal and paternal autonomy-support, as well as how much they endorse their natal and U.S. cultures. Results demonstrated that paternal, but not maternal, autonomy-support predicted greater immersion into the natal culture and positive well-being. Study 2 replicated the previously mentioned effects and extended them by considering additional WB, acculturation, and autonomy-support measures. Possible explanations for the significance of paternal over maternal autonomy-support in our data are discussed.eng
dc.identifier.merlinb6060301xeng
dc.identifier.oclc175303417eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/4949
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/4949eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.subject.lcshAutonomy in childreneng
dc.subject.lcshFather and childeng
dc.subject.lcshChildren of immigrantseng
dc.titleThe influence of paternal autonomy-support upon ethnic culture identification among second-generation immigrantseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychology (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.A.eng


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