The Department of Finance is one of the four academic units within the Trulaske College of Business. Its faculty members are committed to quality teaching, meaningful research and service to the university and professional communities. All of the Departmental faculty have earned doctorates. Finance majors represent 33 percent of the Trulaske College of Business undergraduates and 40 percent of the MBAs. Departmental faculty provide instruction in more than 20 different courses taught at the undergraduate, masters and doctoral levels.

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Recent Submissions

  • Household financial choice: three essays 

    Finke, Michael S. (University of Missouri--Columbia, 2011)
    This dissertation examines household characteristics the impact financial decision making. The first essay explores the role of cognitive ability in numeracy, risk tolerance, credit decisions, wealth and retirement savings ...
  • Three essays on financial contracting 

    Tamm, Christopher J., 1980- (University of Missouri--Columbia, 2010)
    In these essays, I examine the characteristics of financial contracts around Chapter 11 bankruptcy. In the first essay, I document significant changes firms make in the type and characteristics of its debt and equity ...
  • Three essays on stock market liquidity and earnings seasons 

    Nikiforov, Andrei I., 1975- (University of Missouri--Columbia, 2009)
    In these essays, I identify the effects of earnings seasons (i.e., the clustering of earnings releases), on stock market liquidity and asset pricing. In the first essay, I document strong seasonal regularities associated ...
  • Three essays on dividend and payout policy 

    Unlu, Emre, 1978- (University of Missouri--Columbia, 2007)
    This dissertation contains 3 essays on dividend/payout policy. In the first essay, using a sample of 76,129 firm-years from 32 countries, I show that both the probability and amount of dividend payments are significantly ...
  • Three essays on firm-specific volatility 

    Schutte, Maria Gabriela (University of Missouri--Columbia, 2007)
    The central objective of my dissertation is to study the behavior of firm-specific volatility in countries around the world. Consistent with existing literature, I use firm-specific volatility to measure two important ...
  • Three essays on the corporate debt choice 

    Arena, Matteo P., 1973- (University of Missouri--Columbia, 2006)
    This dissertation examines the determinants of the corporate debt choice between different forms of debt financing and different countries. By examining the most extensive sample of U.S. debt issues to date, Essay 1 shows ...
  • Three essays on banking: agency, opacity, and fragility 

    Haggard, K. Stephen (University of Missouri--Columbia, 2006)
    Banks play a central role in the economy of the United States. As in most developed countries, banks in the United States are regulated to prevent activities on the part of bank managers that might place deposits at risk. ...
  • Essays on closed end funds: disclosure, discounts and performance 

    McCormick, Gary Paul, 1953- (University of Missouri--Columbia, 2006)
    Closed end funds provide a unique asset class for academic research due to that fact that they typically trade at a price different from the Net Asset Value (NAV). This is known as the discount. The first essay examines ...
  • New equity issues, share repurchases, and the predictability of aggregate stock returns: an international perspective 

    Wang, Qi (Carol), 1971- (University of Missouri--Columbia, 2006)
    This dissertation investigates the predictive effects of the aggregate stock market returns by new equity issues and shares repurchase in a broader cross-section of 41 countries. I apply a comparative analysis to this study ...
  • Essays on closed-end funds: internal versus external management and insider trading 

    Allen, William D. (University of Missouri--Columbia, 2006)
    This dissertation examines two aspects of closed-end funds (CEF). First, a limited number of these funds maintain the historical management structure of internally allocating resources to investments as opposed to hiring ...