The University of Missouri School of Medicine has improved health, education and research in Missouri for more than 160 years. MU physicians treat patients from every county in the state, and MU is a primary provider of training for all physicians in Missouri. The School of Medicine's more than 650 faculty physicians and scientists educate approximately 1,000 medical students, residents, fellows and other students seeking advanced degrees. Their research is focused on potentially lifesaving discoveries that address the most prevalent health problems.

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  • Monitoring home BP readings just got easier 

    Jarrett, Jennie B; Hogan, Linda; Lyon, Corey (Family Physicians Inquiries Network, 2016-10)
    Monitoring home BP readings just got easier. This novel method of identifying patients with uncontrolled hypertension correlates well with ambulatory BP monitoring. Practice changer: Use this easy “3 out of 10 rule” to ...
  • Deliver or wait with late preterm membrane rupture? 

    Bergeson, Keri; Prasad, Shailendra (Family Physicians Inquiries Network, 2016-11)
    Deliver or wait with late preterm membrane rupture? While ACOG recommends delivery for all women with ruptured membranes after 34 weeks’ gestation, a new study finds expectant management may be the way to go. Practice ...
  • Yeast infection in pregnancy? Think twice about fluconazole 

    Barzin, Amir; Mounsey, Anne (Family Physicians Inquiries Network, 2016-09)
    Yeast infection in pregnancy? Think twice about fluconazole. This study’s findings regarding the risk of miscarriage may mean it’s time to forego fluconazole in favor of topical azoles as first-line treatment. Practice ...
  • Does knuckle popping lead to arthritis? 

    Powers, Tye; Kelsberg, Gary; Safranek, Sarah (2016-10)
    Q: Does knuckle popping lead to arthritis? Evidence-based answer: No, habitual knuckle popping, or cracking (over the course of several decades) isn’t associated with clinical or radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis ...
  • Which SSRIs most effectively treat depression in adolescents? 

    DeLucia, Valory; Kelsberg, Gary; Safranek, Sarah (2016-09)
    Q: Which SSRIs most effectively treat depression in adolescents? Evidence-based answer: We don’t know which selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the most effective and safe because no studies have compared ...
  • Which treatments are safe and effective for chronic sinusitis? 

    Over, Darrell R. (2016-11)
    Q: Which treatments are safe and effective for chronic sinusitis? Evidence-based answer: for adults with chronic rhinosinusitis (crs), intranasal steroid (ins) therapy is more likely than placebo to improve symptoms (50% ...
  • Which patients with metabolic syndrome benefit from metformin? 

    Stover, Liz; Kelsberg, Gary; Safranek, Sarah (2016-11)
    Q Which patients with metabolic syndrome benefit from metformin? Evidence-based answer: patients at highest risk for progression to diabetes benefit from metformin. In patients with metabolic syndrome who are in the ...
  • How do clinical prediction rules compare with joint fluid analysis in diagnosing gout? 

    Westerfield, Katie L; Mounsey, Anne; Nashelsky, Joan (2016-11)
    Q: How do clinical prediction rules compare with joint fluid analysis in diagnosing gout? Evidence-based answer: clinical prediction rules effectively diagnose gout without joint fluid analysis. The American College of ...
  • On-demand pill protocol protects against HIV 

    Justesen, Kathryn; Prasad, Shailendra (Family Physicians Inquiries Network, 2016-08)
    On-demand pill protocol protects against HIV: Finally, there’s an effective prevention strategy—other than condoms—that can be used, as needed, by patients at high risk for HIV infection. Practice changer: Offer patients ...
  • MUtation, 2001 

    University of Missouri--Columbia. School of Medicine; University of Missouri--Columbia. School of Nursing (University of Missouri--Columbia, 2001)
  • MUtation, 1978 

    University of Missouri--Columbia. School of Medicine; University of Missouri--Columbia. School of Nursing (University of Missouri--Columbia, 1978)
  • MUtation, 1978 

    University of Missouri--Columbia. School of Medicine; University of Missouri--Columbia. School of Nursing (University of Missouri--Columbia, 1978)
  • MUtation, 1996 

    University of Missouri--Columbia. School of Medicine; University of Missouri--Columbia. School of Nursing (University of Missouri--Columbia, 1996)
  • MUtation, 1991 

    University of Missouri--Columbia. School of Medicine; University of Missouri--Columbia. School of Nursing (University of Missouri--Columbia, 1991)
  • MUtation, 1990 

    University of Missouri--Columbia. School of Medicine; University of Missouri--Columbia. School of Nursing (University of Missouri--Columbia, 1990)
  • MUtation, 1989 

    University of Missouri--Columbia. School of Medicine; University of Missouri--Columbia. School of Nursing (University of Missouri--Columbia, 1989)
  • MUtation, 1988 

    University of Missouri--Columbia. School of Medicine; University of Missouri--Columbia. School of Nursing (University of Missouri--Columbia, 1988)
  • MUtation, 1986 

    University of Missouri--Columbia. School of Medicine; University of Missouri--Columbia. School of Nursing (University of Missouri--Columbia, 1986)
  • MUtation, 1985 

    University of Missouri--Columbia. School of Medicine; University of Missouri--Columbia. School of Nursing (University of Missouri--Columbia, 1985)

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